Radhananda Dasa

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  • in reply to: Karma and Contagious Diseases #10049
    Radhananda Dasa
    Participant

    Though it is true that one’s nature is constantly changing, Krishna created the varnas based on nature (guna), for gradual spiritual progress. Krishna twice mentions in Bhagavad Gita that it is better to act as per one’s own nature even if it is imperfectly executed as opposed to perfectly executing prescribed duties contract to one’s nature. Thus acting according to one’s varna leads to perfection, and in that regard it seems important the one finds out one’s varna and according to it. Srila Bhaktivinoda Thakura in his ‘Sri Caitanya-siksamrta’ mentions that one should find out one’s varna and according to it for gradual spiritual progress:
    “A person should do that work and follow those rules of varna which are most suitable to his nature. By honest judgment a person can determine the work and lifestyle most suitable to himself, and if he cannot do so, he should consult a competent authority. ”
    Bhakti-yoga entails all other yogas – dhyana yoga, jnanan yoga and karma-yoga. But if one doesn’t act as per one’s nature, there is no possibility of karma-yoga (yoga of based on prescribed duties as per nature). And there is no such thing as ugra-karma-yoga and vikarma-yoga. In this context isn’t it important to find one’s varna, as it doesn’t seem to be useless exercise, rather foundationally important for spiritual progress.

    Radhananda Dasa
    Participant

    Thank-you very much for this insightful post. Having many hands means doing many things of the same type makes sense. For instance Banasura is described as playing 500 drums one occasion and shooting through 500 bows on another occasion using his 1000 arms, which are all same type of activities at any given type. From what I understood, this suggests that his arms are stretched over a larger extent on the same node.
    In case of Vishnu, He is manifesting different paraphernalia (for different abilities) in each of His arms suggesting His arms span across the nodes. When a sense spans across nodes, it seems that the versatility can still manifest in each of these nodes.
    If space types are limited to para, pasyanti, madhyama and vaikhari, how come there are infinite dimensions? It seems these dimensions are based on versatility of abilities, and not based on subtlety or grossness of matter as expressed by the space types para, pasyanti, madhyama and vaikhari. Please let me know if I am missing something.

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