Ciprian Begu

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  • in reply to: Massive space structures, pictorial depth and constellations #11398
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    Thank you.
    This is such a suggestive image, perfectly encompassing the attitude behind the grave, serious and sophisticated tone of modern science:
    “Every small discovery they make, they get excited like children finding a new toy. Then some children fight with other children over who will play with that toy. And each child wants to do something different with that toy. So, the grown up adults should not be overwhelmed by such things.”

    in reply to: Destruction and its relationship with anger #8964
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    I’m grateful for the very thorough answer, thank you. The subtlety of the relationship between anger and destruction was a welcome revelation.

    Are you thinking that this has something to do with the Christian concept of an angry God who punishes and destroys things if His will is not fulfilled? There is no such God, IMHO.

    No, actually, I was thinking of both the account of Lord Shiva (more precisely now Rudra) being born out of Brahma’s anger and how you described the rakshasha associates of the sun-god in Cosmic Theogony as being certain kind of “teachers” through their destructive activities; on this last point, I then thought about the rakshashas that came to trash Daksha’s yajna in Srimad Bhagavatam, in the context of Daksha’s insult to Lord Shiva.
    The Christian concept of an angry God who punishes people for going against His will has always seemed strange to me. But I did take it figuratively to mean that if you break the moral law you will be punished at some point. I just didn’t have the knowledge of how this could be done, and the theory of karma and reincarnation from the Vedas provided this long-sought answer.

    in reply to: Contextual morality and phases of life #7142
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    Thank you. It’s interesting how these phases are sometimes expressed with various ceremonies in different cultures. The Catholics have “confirmation of faith” at 14. Americans in general have the “sweet 16” special birthday, Jews have “bat mitzvah” at 13.
     

    in reply to: What is God's management style? #6999
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    Is it fair to say that, in the ultimate analysis — however He does it — God and as our Father and Mother (pitāham asya jagato mātā dhātā pitāmahaḥ), does what is best and necessary for the soul, even though it might not seem that way from our perspective?

    in reply to: What is God's management style? #6994
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    This is a great answer. This send my mind me to your blog article on the Vedic unconscious, where you say that the original emotion that sends souls in the material world is envy of God, which then leads to fear and then to desire. There, you describe Lord Shiva as Pasupati (Master of the Animal) and Maya as His consort which both deludes and instigates the soul into desire. I guess, in Christianity, this would be the equivalent of “being tempted by the Devil”. At first glance, this is very perplexing, but, as you say in that article:

    Superficially, it appears that by baiting, material nature is actually instigating the soul to get up and fight. At a closer look, however, we can see that material nature is only reminding the soul that it is very small and it has to surrender. Material nature is therefore also a spiritual energy—but it is spirituality meant for the envious.

    in reply to: What is creativity and why are creators so neurotic? #6876
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    Thank you for an amazingly edifying answer. It really helped clear some cobwebs in my creative life.
    On a related note, I know there are many people who want to follow a spiritual path and express themselves creatively in writing, music, arts, even science and philosophy. Are there any principles that could guide one in such a difficult task, of integrating creativity and being philosophically sound? What are the pitfalls and how can we avoid falling into them, while still feeling that we have created something?

    in reply to: Free Will and God #6664
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    @sai This is indeed an interesting question.
    Like Ashish said, the encountered situation is in fact arranged by God (or His Energy, Shakti, which is all the possibilities of choice). Whether God knows or wants to know all the future choices you will make from the possibility I think is intriguing. From the theory exposed by Ashish so far, God pays attention to the material world sequentially, whereas He pays attention to what happens in the spiritual world simultaneously. That is because God wants to know what He is (His internal energy) all the time, while He wants to know what He is not (Maha-Maya) only one sometimes.
    So the question is does God wants to know your future choices in the material world? Because if He doesn’t, He won’t know them (I think). @Ashish, please correct me if I’m going on a limb here…

    in reply to: The Fourteen Planetary Systems #6594
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    As a result, the living beings on this planet have nearly equal influences of divine and demonic natures with the divine nature dominating only slightly.

    This is very intriguing. Indeed, in many religious traditions there is this concept of a battle between good and evil, for the souls of humans, with angels representing virtue and light and demons representing vice and darkness. However, the image of demons that you’re showing here is apparently more subtle than the traditional figure of a blood-thirsty ghoul haunting and possessing people and continuously mocking God.
    By this definition most freedom-loving individualists that are into technology, controlling and shaping nature to their own will, and confidently secular or atheistic would be classified as demons. What is then the difference between the demons in horror stories (haunting graveyards, possessing people to enjoy vices through their bodies etc) and these demons you are describing?
    Also, do the demons have a functional, necessary role in the universe like the demigods (devas)? Are there demons who rule over certain concepts so that they are also represented in our bodies and minds, just like devas are?

    in reply to: What is the brain? #6593
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    So the head is not higher in all respects, but it is functionally higher.

    Could you elaborate more on this? What is the function of the head, hands, feet, stomach etc?
    Also what is the relationship between the chemicals in the brain (like neurotransmitters) and the perception of those neurotransmitters (qualia), which must be in a hierarchically higher space?
    When a thought forms in the mind is it then expressed at the level of the brain in a chemical configuration?

    in reply to: Do forms exist? #6592
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    @Sai
    You could start with:
    Chapter 1: A Definition of God, from Ashish’s book Uncommon Wisdom: Fault Lines in the Foundations of Atheism
    Sāńkhya and Modern Atomism
    Lessons of Ayurveda for Vedic Cosmology
    Hope it helps
     
     
     
     

    in reply to: What is entropy in the semantic view of nature? #6568
    Ciprian Begu
    Participant

    In thermodynamics, entropy is commonly associated with the amount of order, disorder, or chaos in a thermodynamic system. An increase in entropy means an increase in disorder and a decrease in entropy means a decrease in disorder — or, positively speaking, an increase in information. Is this correct? And what does this mean from the perspective of the semantic view of nature? Is this decrease in order an empirical measure of irreversible time winding down the universe to a state of chaos at the end?

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)